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Legacy:Unreal Engine Versions/1

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Contents

Engine Development Credits

Unreal Engine Core System Design

  • Tim Sweeney

Engine Development Management

  • Tim Sweeney

Engine Management System

  • Tim Sweeney

UnrealEd

  • Tim Sweeney (UnrealEd 1)
  • Warren Marshall (UnrealEd 2+)

Rendering Engine

  • Tim Sweeney (Main, scene graph, animation system)
  • Erik De Neve (Optimized renderer, procedural texture effects)
  • Daniel Vogel (Renderer devices, skeletal animation)

Physics Engine

  • Tim Sweeney (Unreal Physics)

Network Engine

  • Tim Sweeney (Unreal Network)

Sound Engine

  • Carlo Vogelsang (Galaxy Audio)
  • Module Musics (Freeware)

A.I. System

  • Steven Polge (Unreal A.I.)

Console Porting

  • Brandon Reinhart (PlayStation 2 Porting)
  • Secrel Level (Dreamcast Porting)

Builds Versions

  • Unreal Build 1~226
    • Build 99: 1997 beta
    • Build 100: out of box
    • Build 200: second out of box
    • Build 209: patch 1
    • Build
    • Unreal PSX port by Pterodactyl Software (PlayStation 1) - cancelled
    • Unreal N64 port by DMA design (Nintendo 64) - cancelled
  • Unreal Tournament Build 300~613
    • Build 300: offer to licensees
    • Build 321: 3DFX only beta demo
    • Build 322: 3DFX only beta demo, 321 to 322 patch
    • Build 338: beta demo
    • Build 348: official demo
    • Build 400: out of box
    • Build 402: patch 1
    • Build 405: beta patch
    • Build 406: beta patch
    • Build 413: patch 2
    • Build 420: patch 3
    • Build 425: patch 4
    • Build 428: patch 5
    • Build 432: patch 6
    • Build 433: beta patch
    • Build 435: beta patch
    • Build 436: patch 7
    • Build 533: offer to licensees
    • Build 583: offer to licensees
    • Build 613: offer to licensees
    • Unreal Tournament PS2 port (PlayStation 2)
    • Unreal Tournament DC port by Secret Level (Dreamcast)

Engine Details

Rendering Technologies

  • 3DFX Glide, S3 Metal, PowerVR SGL, Direct3D 5 (Build 216), Direct3D 6 (Build 218), Direct 3D 7 (Build 226), Direct3D 8 (Builds 500+) and OpenGL (Builds 209+), software rendering support
  • 32-bit fully colored soft animated dynamic lighting
    • Multicolored lighting
      • with true colored intermixing of fuzzy shadows
    • Supports raytraced and enveloped lighting
    • Radial, cylindrical, spotlight, searchlight, ambient, spherical, shell, and 20+ special effect lights
    • Caustic effects such as "fire waver", "watery shimmer", and the like can be applied to lights
    • Supports lens flares and coronas
  • Extensible BSP and portal technology
    • Mirror surfaces
    • Semireflective materials, such as marble surfaces which partially reflect light
    • Non-euclidean, redirectable "warp" portal effects for seeing through teleporters
    • Seeing through windows into an infinite sky zone in which a sky, planets, mountains, and other objects are constructed
    • Skies and backgrounds with independent coordinate systems for independent translation and rotationz
  • Enhanced Quadtree/Octree support (Builds 400+)
  • Major enhancements to the rendering engine speed (Builds 400+)
  • Curved-surface rendering support
    • with an adaptive level-of-detail subdivision surface rendering algorithm
    • eliminating polygonization
  • 32-bit colored 512x512 size texture support
    • Emboss bump mapping
    • Multi-texturing
    • Dynamic range scaled detail textures
    • Procedurally animated textures
  • ClipTexturing
  • Multiple channels of vertex animation support
  • Skeletal animation support (Builds 432+)
    • Smooth-skinned Geometry (Builds 500+)
  • Facial animation (Builds 500+)
    • With lipsync animation (Builds 533+)
  • Hardware brush with static meshes (Builds 500+)
  • Height-mapped filed terrain support (Builds 500+)
  • Decal support (Builds 300+)
  • Light bloom
  • Fog volume
  • Distance fog
  • Volumetric lighting
  • S3TC texture compression (Builds 400+)
  • High resolution texture 1024x1024 size support (Builds 400+)
  • Environment mapping support
  • Multy-skybox system
  • Very improved multi-skybox system (Builds 400+)
  • Complex particles system
  • Extensible particles system (Builds 400+)

Other Features

  • Fully digital audio based module sound system
  • Digital music, MP3, CD Audio, module music, s3m, etc support
  • Doppler shift
  • A3D support
  • Software 3D sound
  • Surround sound
  • Dynamic Music System
  • Improved support on A3D, EAX, DS3D (Builds 400+)
  • Newly highly enhancing A.I. algorithms and BOT A.I. and teamwork A.I. (Builds 400+)
  • Newly very improved network code (Builds 400+)
  • Real-time recording of in-engine footage as replayable 'demo' files
  • Enhanced demo reconding system (Builds 400+)
  • GUI editor
  • Imploved GUI editor (Builds 400+)
  • Native support for localization of text to 8-bit languages, via CODEPAGE 850 and replaceable fonts
    • Built-in UnrealScript and C++ support for externalization of all text, enabling non-programmer translation to all 8-bit languages

Development Tools

Projects

Released Projects

Unreal Engine 1 using released projects on more than 50 over titles, included all of the unknowned PC, PS2, Dreamcast titles

Project Developer Release Date Engine Build
Unreal PC (Windows, Linux) / Macintosh – Epic Mega Games / Digital Extremes May 25, 1998 Builds 100-226
Star Trek: The Next Generation: Klingon Honor Guard Microprose November 1, 1998 Builds 216-219
TNN Outdoors Pro Hunter DreamForge Entertainment December 1, 1998 Builds 216-220
Unreal Mission Pack 1: Return to Na Pali Legend Entertainment June 26, 1999 Builds 224-226
Dr. Brain Action/Reaction Knowledge Adventure August 19, 1999 Build 224
Virtual Reality Notre-Dame: A Real-Time Virtual Reconstruction Digitalo Studios August 30, 1999 Builds 224
Nerf Arena Blast Visionary Media October 31, 1999 Build 300
The Wheel of Time Legend Entertainment November 11, 1999 Build 300-333
Unreal Tournament PC (Windows, Linux) / Macintosh / PlayStation 2 – Epic Games / Digital Extremes
Dreamcast – Secret Level
PC – November 23, 1999
PlayStation 2 – October 21, 2000
Dreamcast – March 13, 2001
PC – Builds 338-436
PlayStation 2 – Build 436
Dreamcast – Build 436
Unrealty Perilith Industrielle May 18, 2000 Builds 405
Deus Ex PC (Windows, Linux) / Macintosh – ION Storm Austin June 23, 2000 Builds 400-436
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Fallen Simon & Schuster October 27, 2000 Build 338
Rune Human Head Studios October 31, 2000 Builds 420-436
Clive Barker's Undying DreamWorks Interactive February 21, 2001 Build 420
Adventure Pinball: Forgotten Island Digital Extremes March 23, 2001 Build 420
X-COM: Enforcer Microprose April 19, 2001 Build 420
Rune: Halls of Valhalla Human Head Studios April 27, 2001 Build 436
Rune: Viking Warlord Human Head Studios June 28, 2001 Build 436
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone KnowWonder PC – November 16, 2001 Build 433
New Legends Infinite Machine Febraury 17, 2002 Build 613
Deus Ex: The Conspiracy ION Storm Austin March 26, 2002 Build 436
Tactical Ops: Assault on Terror Kamehan Studios April 23, 2002 Build 436
Mobile Forces Rage Software May 11, 2002 Build 533
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets KnowWonder PC – November 8, 2002 Build 450
Disney's Brother Bear KnowWonder November 11, 2003 Build 460
Duke Nukem Forever 3D Realms / Triptych Games / Gearbox Software International – June 10, 2011
North America – June 14, 2011
Build 613
  • Duke Nukem Forever is NOT using Unreal Engine 2. It's still a based on heavily modified Unreal Engine 1 build 613, which included some UE2 stuff such as Hardware Brush(Static Meshes)

DNF engine history:

  • early 1997: 3D Realms, started the DNF project with their own PREY engine.
  • summer 1997: changed to id Software's QUAKE 1 engine.
  • winter 1997: upgraded to id Software's QUAKE 2 engine.
  • E3 1998: Released on QUAKE 2 engine based DNF at E3.
  • summer 1998: changed to Epic Games' UNREAL engine.
  • autumn 1999: upgraded to the Epic Games' UNREAL TOURNAMENT engine.
  • autumn 2000: they taken some UE2 stuff such as STATIC MESHES(HARDWARE BRUSH).
  • E3 2001: Released on UNREAL ENGINE build 613 based DNF at E3.
  • summer 2001: they have written a tremendous amount of their own rendering system.
  • spring 2005: included MEQON Physics Engine.

Currently DNF engine Spec

  • based on heavily modified Unreal Engine 1 core system framework
  • uses a Unreal Engine 1 based UnrealScript Programming Language
  • Unreal Engine 1 based Network Engine
  • heavily modified UnrealEd 2.0 called the DukeEd (Duke Enormous Tool)
  • included some Unreal Engine 2 stuff such as Static Meshes
  • 3D Realms own Rendering engine
  • Meqon Physics Engine

Non-gaming Projects

Unreal Engine 1 is used in some non-gaming projects including construction simulation and design, training simulation, driving simulation, virtual reality shopping malls, movie storyboards, continuity, pre-visual, etc.

Related Topics

Discussion

Xian: So from what I understand, UE1 officially stopped at build 613 (used for licenses) which include a prototype version of what UE2 features, am I correct ?

El Muerte: no, there is no official "end" of UE1 or "begin" of UE2.

Xian: I see. So all those "new" features are things each developer added by themselves?

El Muerte: yes and no, in quite some cases licensees added features, but it also happens a lot that they backport features of newer versions of the engine, rather than completely upgrading to the newer version of the engine. For example, if you're using version 600 and have most of it nailed down and stable, you don't want to migrate to version 700 just for one new feature. You would backport it to version 600. It's much less work. You should take the engine version information about 3rd party titles with a grain of salt.

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